Power chords

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‘Power’ Chords are used in most styles of music but are particularly useful for rock guitar; they even sound cool on acoustic (check out Nirvana’s Unplugged album for an awesome example). The basic idea is that you only have to learn one chord shape, and that one shape can move around the fingerboard to make other chords. It uses no open strings, and muting the unused open strings is a very important part of the technique.

LTD seven string guitars on blue

They consist of grooves arranged spirally. The groove always begins in order from the end regions to the center of the subjected disc.

Around more than a decade ago, they were first produced from polyvinyl chloride and quickly became a sort of a companion.
The market was large enough to surpass the cassettes. They are of different characteristics depending on the dimensions such as diameter, rotation, speed, and revolutions per minute.

It is more of a beautification or a visual form of expression.

A lot of the users from that hype era have reported loving the way they sounded—however, there are a few who miss the scratches, skips, or pops.

Album art indeed gained the most amount of traction during the LP days. Vinyl records were a temporary part of the music industry and still have not changed.

The charm is non-perishable. With the right conditions and apparatus, they still can be considered as the best way to record sound.
Although they are less portable, which is a blotch in terms of convenience, vinyl records are nostalgic, and the retro feel, although much overrated, is hard to ignore.Use your 1st, 3rd and 4th fingers as shown, and start by putting your 1st finger in the 3rd fret of the sixth string (the note G). Then put down your 3rd and 4th fingers. If this is a bit of stretch, don’t worry, you will soon limber up! Try to keep them together, the 3rd finger kind of on top of the 4th as shown.


Some people like to play the two notes on 5th and 4th strings with a small barre with the 3rd finger. It’s O.K. to do that, but I think using two fingers gives you a better finger position on the notes; you’ll get a better sound that way, it makes it easier to change chords most of the time and easier to get all the thin strings muted. I strongly advise to learn it this way, and then if you still prefer to use the little barre you have the option of choosing whichever one works best in any situation!


Try and keep your middle finger relaxed just hanging out where it feels good (shown in the top photo). Don’t try and pull it down to the thin strings; sometimes I do that but only when trying to show the chords in lessonsTry to get your 1st finger to lay softly on strings 3, 2 and 1. You don’t want those notes to sound; you just want to mute the strings. This is very important as it will sound really bad if you let them ring out.


You could just try to be careful, and only play the three strings of the chord, but that is really hard. It means that you will never be able to rock out and hit the strings with any energy, or run around on stage like a rock god…


With a super-low action (see page XX) you might have trouble muting the strings because they will require so little pressure to sound, but you must. It’s the downside of having such a low action. You’ll find barre chords easy, but it’s going to take a light touch and lots of practice to get those notes muted properly.


Quite often, power chords are played with only down-strums, and often with a technique called palm muting, which might make it less vital to mute the unused strings. But it is REALLY important to mute them because many songs do use up- and down-strums with power chords (‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ springs to mind). Also, if you don’t mute them, and you play loud with distortion, the strings might ring out—even if you don’t pick th

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